Thursday, August 03, 2006

Police Report: Repent now!

If the Rhett Bomar fallout wasn’t enough, players seem to be falling over themselves to get in trouble. Auburn suspended linebackers Tray Blackmon and Kevin Sears from playing in the Tigers' first three games against Washington State, at Mississippi State, and LSU. Sears was found guilty in early July on charges of driving under the influence, leaving the scene of an accident and public intoxication when he drove his car off the road and struck a gas main and tree. Even more scary then the possibility of highly flammable gas spewing unfettered into the air, are the charges against Blackmon, who was arrested on charges of underage possession of alcohol and being a pedestrian under the influence of alcohol.



















Ahh! That’s a law?! I think I break that law on a weekly basis. Next thing you know there will be a law against blogging while intoxicated, which regular readers already realize we do here at TNL.
Air Force suspended kicker Ryan Harrison indefinitely for an unspecified violation of school standards.
Utah State linebacker Steven Downs was kicked off the team after being cited by police with marijuana possession.
And out of the “repent now the apocalypse is coming” file, Tennessee tight end Lee Smith was kicked off the team when charged with drunken driving early Wednesday morning after a campus police officer saw him driving on the sidewalk. If Phillip Fulmer is kicking people off his team for disciplinary reasons, the end must be neigh. If Bobby Bowden follows suit, it’s over.

3 comments:

Cool Hand Mike said...

Is it that kids are getting into more trouble or are there just more journalist to blow it wide open?

Cool Hand Mike said...

Tre Blakmon was "repotedly" in a stolen car and bailed out at an intersection. The police caught up later but didn't feel they had enough evidence on the stolen car charge, so they popped him on public drunkeness.

Galen said...

There is no doubt there are more means for these stories to get out. With the internet, stories that would have been more local 10 years ago are now widespread.